Online Twitter Q&A for What Works Wellbeing proposals 3rd December

The What Works Centre for Wellbeing’s commissioning partners, the Economic and Social Research Council, are hosting an online twitter chat on 3rd December between 12 and 2pm about the Centre focusing specifically on the evidence programme call for proposals.

Please see the call page for the full specifications, application guidance and FAQs. A short presentation on the application process will also be available beforehand, and an updated FAQs document will be available after the online Q&A event.

Join the forum to meet others working on wellbeing

→ Send questions

→ Join the discussion on 3 December by logging on to Twitter and following #wwwqa.

  • A Twitter account is required to post questions, though the discussion can be viewed without an account
  • Sign up to the virtual networking forum before the event if you want to post a question.  You will be able to view the forum discussion pages without an account.
  • The Q&A will be run via Twitter.  W will also provide fuller answers and a summary of all questions after the event.

Nancy & Karen

Wellbeing evidence around the globe – Lord Gus O’Donnell in Australia

GusWhen I helped to launch, in London and Bristol, the What Works centre on Wellbeing I said we wanted to gather evidence from around the globe. So it is fitting that I have spent the last week on the other side of the world urging people to pass on their experiences and learning on wellbeing. More specifically I have been in Australia meeting senior officials at the Federal and State level, think tanks and private sector representatives to explain the importance of focusing on wellbeing and behaviour change.

At lectures and seminars in Canberra, Sydney and Melbourne, I  explained  the importance of broad measures of wellbeing and their superiority to activity measures like GDP as indicators of the success of governments and countries. I find that explaining that UK  GDP is now enhanced by increased illegal drug trade and prostitution, while the value of volunteering is not, gets the point across quite vividly! My visit played out against the G20 taking g20logoplace in Brisbane, right in the middle of my Australian visit. President Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping had turned the focus onto climate change to the discomfort of their host Prime Minister Tony Abbott. Nevertheless the G20 was attempting to enhance wellbeing by stimulating infrastructure spending and employment and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. In Australia the government is attempting to eradicate its deficit of 2.5%GDP , rather low compared to the levels in UK and many other European countries. Having got through the financial crisis relatively unscathed there has not been a sense of a burning platform. This, together with some interesting complications thrown up in the last Australian federal election in the influence of minor parties, especially in the Senate or upper house,  has made it harder to make radical changes but it has created a desire to understand how to deliver ‘ better for less’. Hence there was a lot of interest in the measures implemented by the UK government to reduce the deficit from 11%GDP to half that level and particularly the impact on public services and public servants. There was an interesting thread through all of the conversations that tied together the refocusing back on fundamental questions about the value and purpose of government in the first place, which is a necessary part of the broader wellbeing approach, and consequential decisions about the shape and performance of government and the behaviour and skills of public servants in the 21st century.

I emphasised the unusual nature of the UK recovery which was employment strong but accompanied by a stagnation in real wages. The nature of the problems reinforces one key conclusion from a wellbeing approach to macro policy- namely that steady, consistent (and sometimes lower) growth is better than increasingly unsustainable booms and busts. Although there has been some work, and considerably interest, within various departments, including the Australian Treasury over recent years, the concepts and practice of “wellbeing” are still only used rarely in Australia and have yet to establish themselves as a consistent and influential part of the wider political and policy discussion.

Deloitte Social Progress IndexHowever while I was there Deloitte produced a paper on Unlocking true growth,G20: Insights from the Social Progress Index 2014

Their index is an unweighted average of many indicators but includes no measures of subjective wellbeing. Among the G20 their index puts Netherlands at the top but then the Scandinavians, as usual, do very well. Australia ranks above the UK which in turn beats the United States. Although I have questions about aspects of the methodology, it is good to see recognition that “growth on its own without social progress is an empty goal.” The Australians are also beginning to explore behaviour change techniques. Rory Gallagher and Alex Gyani,  as part of the Behavioural Insight team, are based in New South Wales in the Department of Premier and Cabinet and are running a number of projects to demonstrate the merits of the new approaches.

For example they have tested various ways to speed up the payment of taxes and fines, saving the NSW governmentBIT logo millions of dollars. They have found quicker, more effective ways to get people back to work after injuries.  They are investigating how to improve handling of domestic violence and child obesity, both particularly challenging problems in Australia. But probably most important of all, they are running Master classes to train officials in applying behavioural approaches.

I was also fortunate enough to meet Shlomo Benartzi, a highly respected behavioural economist from UCLA. He explained his latest research on digital solutions to key policy problems, which will be published next year.

what works network logoAt each  venue I have described the role of the various What Works centres that are already up and running. And I have explained what we hope will be  provided by the Wellbeing centre in terms of agreeing common methodologies and collecting and sharing examples of what works and what doesn’t. Of course we need to explain that what works in one country or community might not work in another.

At my Sydney University lecture I used the example of various messages attempting to persuade people to sign up asUniofSydney organ donors.  You can hear the podcast of the lecture  (the podcast link is on the right of the linked page).

The Australian audience felt the positive message about saving lives would work best whereas in the UK the reciprocal message- if you would want an organ donation if needed, why not donate yourself- worked best. Nevertheless as we collect evidence of such experiments around the world we may well be able to determine which particular policies work universally. I would like to thank Martin Stewart-Weeks and Deloitte, Cisco and Telstra who supported the visit, for helping me to get across these messages to a wide audience in Australia.

One of the events at which I spoke was the 2014 Spann Oration, given in Sydney for the Institute of Public Administration in NSW.  The Oration, given each year, is in honour of the work of Professor Richard Spann, one of the Australia’s leading public administration academics.  You can find the Oration here, published by The Mandarin, a new online magazine in Australia that concentrates on issues of government reform, the public sector and public policy.

Read a broader summary of some of the main themes and topics from the weeks’ conversations and meetings.


Children & Young people’s wellbeing in the UK

To coincide with a Week of Action organised by the Department of Health and Public Health England aimed at supporting families to provide children with the best start in life, here at the What Works Centre for Wellbeing we’ve pulled together publications showing the latest picture of the wellbeing of children and young people in the UK and some pointers to resources for taking positive action.Shift Child 3

Our Wellbeing Pioneers this week are the National Citizen Service programme, providing a great example of how tangible results in improving young people’s wellbeing can be achieved and Shift, an organisation designing an innovative biofeedback video game to help young people improve their own wellbeing.

Our pioneers are short case studies of real projects, real places, real people and their evaluations.

→ be one of our pioneers

What does the latest picture show about children and young people’s wellbeing?

Exploring the Well-being of Children in the UK, 2014 presents the latest statistical picture of the wellbeing of children in the UK from the ONS Measuring National Wellbeing Programme (published October 2014).

The Good Childhood Report, 2014 is the most recent report from The Children’s Society looking at the wellbeing of children in the UK and highlighting areas for improvement.

5,660 Young People Can’t be Wrong. How Will YOU Help Us? summarises the results of Young Mind’s consultation with 5,600 young people (October 2013- May 2014) asking what the big issues were that made them feel under pressure, how these issues affect them and what needs to be done about them.

Where can I find out more about how to support children and young people’s wellbeing?

logo-eifThe Guidebook from the Early Intervention Foundation is an online, interactive resource for those commissioning and providing services for children and families. It gives details of which programmes have been shown to work most effectively for improving outcomes for children as well as information about what works best in putting them into practice.

The Children’s Society have produced a guide for parents on how to support their children’s wellbeing.

‘Talking Wellbeing’ is a toolkit developed by young people working with the National Children’s Bureau, Our Life and NHS Sefton, with help from Sefton Council and Sefton CVS. It shows how to run a five-step focus group for 14-19 year olds, exploring what wellbeing means to young people, what factors influence it and what they can do to improve their own wellbeing and that of their community.

We hope you like this short collation of evidence and resources. Its our first go at this type of post so your feedback is very welcome.  Please do comment on this post below and tweet recommending other great resources for children and young people’s wellbeing that you’ve found useful and would like to share with others

The development team

Evidence programme – applicants workshop presentations and extended deadline

The evidence programme for the What Works Centre for Wellbeing is being commissioned by the our partners the Economic and Social Research Council.  The specifications for the evidence programme were published on 29th October.

On behalf of all funding partners, the ESRC is commissioning four wellbeing themed evidence programmes to look at what works for wellbeing:

  • cross-cutting capability
  • work, learning and wellbeing
  • community wellbeing
  • culture, sport and wellbeing

There was an applicants workshop on 5th November and the presentations from that workshop are now available.

Based on the level of interest, the deadline for the What Works Wellbeing Call has been extended to 21 January 2015.

You can contribute to the development of the centre in other ways here.

Videos from our launch events 29th October 2014 – Part 1 London

The What Works Centre for Wellbeing was announced by our interim Chair Lord Gus O’Donnell on 29th October 2014 at two events, in London and Bristol.  Here are the video of the speakers from the London part of the day with sessions from:

  • Lord O’Donnell chair of the centre’s development group
  • BIS Minister Jo Swinson
  • BT’s Group Director Wellbeing Dr Paul Litchfield
  • Professor Kevin Fenton from Pubilc Health England
  • Government’s National What Works Advisor Dr David Halpern
  • Chief Executive of the Economic and Social Research Council Professor Jane Elliot

Also published for the London part of the event on the 29th was BIS research into the drivers of workplace wellbeing and its links with business performance and the ESRC specifications for the Centre’s evidence programme.

What can I do?

Announcement of the What Works Centre for Wellbeing Lord Gus O’Donnell, Chair of development group for the Centre

Employee wellbeing and productivity  Jo Swinson, Minister for Employment Relations and Consumer Affairs

Wellbeing – A company approach  Dr Paul Litchfield, Group Director Wellbeing, BT  

Wellbeing and public health  Prof Kevin Fenton, National Director Health and Wellbeing, Public Health England 

What works centres  Dr David Halpern, What Works National Advisor 

Getting impact from research Prof Jane Elliott, Chief Executive Economic Social Research Council