What we are saying about Community Wellbeing counts

Our Public Dialogues looked in part at community
Community wellbeing

Here, the participants from Belfast reflect on discussing community wellbeing in a dialogue setting and the how the findings should be used:

 

Community wellbeing is about support, belonging, safety.

As members of the public we understand community wellbeing as the links between people living in an area with family, friends, school and work providing the backbone. Community resilience is a sense of pride and belonging to a place with positive interaction between people who help each other, are supportive, respectful and have friendly relationships.

Our community wellbeing includes:active communities

  • Basic needs for good quality of life
  • Our connections with others
  • Practical and emotional support especially when negotiating key life stages
  • Effective communication so we are heard, have a voice and stand for something
  • Feeling inspired, pride and part of something bigger

Public dialogues bring together members of the public and policy makers to discuss wellbeing and understand what matters to people.We spoke to a range of policy makers on:

  • why it’s important to talk about wellbeing
  • why are we talking about community,
  • about the value the centre can have across the UK
  • importance of dialogues with the public

→ Discover more about our Public Dialogues:

→ Findings summary

→Community Public Dialogue

→Technical Appendix

Summary Community Evidence Programme Voice of the User report– Short

→ Community Evidence team Voice of the User Detailed report – Long

 

Expert Teams and Board Members appointed for What Works Centre for Wellbeing

The Wha8-2754esrc-logot Works Centre for Wellbein2903577 What Works Banner Stand V0_2.inddg, together with the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) have announced the successful bids for four research programmes to understand what really works to improve the wellbeing of people in the UK.

Over the next three years, the What Works Centre for Wellbeing will enable policy-makers, local authorities,  employers and others to use evidence of wellbeing impact in decision making and to improve people’s lives, by translating academic evaluation of wellbeing measures into easy-to-use information about effectiveness, cost and applicability.

The successful consortia are led by world-renowned academics

Professor Richard LayardProfessor Kevin DanielsProfessor Peter KindermanProfessor Christina Victor

 

 

 

Overall, the research spans twelve universities, five civil society groups, and reaches internationally through the OECD. More detailed information on the teams and the work of the evidence programmes is here

The Centre and evidence programmes have been funded by a number of partner organisations.

 Cross-Cutting Capabilities

Professor Lord Richard Layard, LSE, leads the Cross-Cutting Capabilities programme, working in collaboration with

  • London School of Economics
  • Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
  • Institute for Education

They are partnering with

  • Action for Happiness
  • University of Oxford
  • How to Thrive

The team will assess and develop methods of understanding how policy and practice affect wellbeing. They will look at the effect of different factors on wellbeing, analyse the impact of wellbeing on other outcomes and develop a framework for cost-effectiveness analysis with wellbeing as the measure of benefit.  They will also conduct life course analysis, looking at the how important early life is to wellbeing in later years.

Work, Learning and Wellbeing

Professor Kevin Daniels, UEA, leads the Work, Learning and Wellbeing evidence programme, a collaboration between

  • University of East Anglia
  • University of Essex

The evidence programme is focused on protecting and enhancing the wellbeing of workers, adult learners and those seeking work.

Bringing Wellbeing to Community

Prof Peter Kinderman, University of Liverpool, leads the Community Wellbeing evidence programme. His team is a collaboration of five universities including

  • Heseltine Institute for Public Policy and Practice at the University of Liverpool
  • Sheffield University
  • Leeds Beckett University
  • Goldsmiths, University of London
  • Durham University

They are joined by five civil society organisations including

  • New Economics Foundation
  • Locality
  • Happy City
  • Centre for Local Economic Strategies
  • Social Life Ltd

The evidence programme will focus on how community wellbeing is affected by issues such as local social networks, having a say over what happens in our community, and local living conditions.

Culture, Sport and Wellbeing

Professor Christina Victor, Brunel University London, leads the Culture, Sport and Wellbeing evidence programme, a collaboration between

  • Brunel University London
  • University of Brighton
  • London School of Economics
  • University of Winchester

They will look at the wellbeing benefits of participation in different culture and sport practices for people in a wide range of circumstances.

Board appointments

PaulLitchfieldThe Centre has recently appointed its first Board of non-executive Directors. The Chair, Dr Litchfield, is joined by:

Gregor Henderson (National Lead for Wellbeing and Mental Health at Public Health England), and Phil Sooben (Director of Policy, Resources and Communications, ESRC) will join the board for an initial period as the Centre’s major partners in delivery.

Further recruitment for board members, including specifically from areas of local government and academia are still to come. Follow this website for the latest opportunities.

Community wellbeing

Here at the What Works Centre for Wellbeing, we think communities are really important to improving wellbeing,  they’re the focus of one of our programmes of evidence.
kfenton blog

Public Health England has today launched a guide to  community centred approaches to health and wellbeing.

 

Pkfphoto-e1379332487234-147x150rofessor Kevin Fenton , the Public Health England National Director for Health and Wellbeing  blogged about why communities matter to health.

 

Our pioneer this week reflects the community approach to improving wellbeing, Well London who’s vision is : A world city of empowered local communities, who have the skills and confidence to take control of and improve their individual and collective health and well-being.

→ be one of our wellbeing pioneers

Finally, a reminder that the deadline for applications to become one of our trustees is the 16th Feb at 8am.

Videos from our launch events 29th October – Part 2 Bristol

The What Works Centre for Wellbeing was announced by our interim Chair Lord Gus O’Donnell on 29th October 2014 at twoKnowleWestMediaCentre events, in London and Bristol. Here are the video of the speakers from the Bristol part of the day with sessions from:

  • Mayor of Bristol George Ferguson
  • Lord Gus O’Donnell Chair of the What Works Centre’s Development Group
  • Ed Humpherson from UK Statistics Authority
  • Liz Zeidler from Happy City Bristol
  • Dr Shona Arora Centre Director of the Avon, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire Public Health England Centre
  • Q&A from the audience at Knowle West Media Centre in Bristol

Also published to coincide with the announcement of the What Works for Wellbeing Centre on 29th October was a new dataset from ONS combining the first three years of national personal wellbeing data to enable a more robust local level analysis and the ESRC specifications for the Centre’s evidence programme.

→what can I do?

Today we have also added a new pioneer case study to the site:

Our pioneers are short case studies of real projects, real places, real people and their evaluations.

→ be one of our pioneers

Welcome and Bristol context Mayor of Bristol George Ferguson 

Wellbeing – the new currency of impact Lord Gus O’Donnell

Measuring What Matters Ed Humpherson  

Happy City – What has worked in Bristol? Liz Zeidler 

Wellbeing and local public health Dr Shona Arora

Q&A with the speakers

Children & Young people’s wellbeing in the UK

To coincide with a Week of Action organised by the Department of Health and Public Health England aimed at supporting families to provide children with the best start in life, here at the What Works Centre for Wellbeing we’ve pulled together publications showing the latest picture of the wellbeing of children and young people in the UK and some pointers to resources for taking positive action.Shift Child 3

Our Wellbeing Pioneers this week are the National Citizen Service programme, providing a great example of how tangible results in improving young people’s wellbeing can be achieved and Shift, an organisation designing an innovative biofeedback video game to help young people improve their own wellbeing.

Our pioneers are short case studies of real projects, real places, real people and their evaluations.

→ be one of our pioneers

What does the latest picture show about children and young people’s wellbeing?

Exploring the Well-being of Children in the UK, 2014 presents the latest statistical picture of the wellbeing of children in the UK from the ONS Measuring National Wellbeing Programme (published October 2014).

The Good Childhood Report, 2014 is the most recent report from The Children’s Society looking at the wellbeing of children in the UK and highlighting areas for improvement.

5,660 Young People Can’t be Wrong. How Will YOU Help Us? summarises the results of Young Mind’s consultation with 5,600 young people (October 2013- May 2014) asking what the big issues were that made them feel under pressure, how these issues affect them and what needs to be done about them.

Where can I find out more about how to support children and young people’s wellbeing?

logo-eifThe Guidebook from the Early Intervention Foundation is an online, interactive resource for those commissioning and providing services for children and families. It gives details of which programmes have been shown to work most effectively for improving outcomes for children as well as information about what works best in putting them into practice.

The Children’s Society have produced a guide for parents on how to support their children’s wellbeing.

‘Talking Wellbeing’ is a toolkit developed by young people working with the National Children’s Bureau, Our Life and NHS Sefton, with help from Sefton Council and Sefton CVS. It shows how to run a five-step focus group for 14-19 year olds, exploring what wellbeing means to young people, what factors influence it and what they can do to improve their own wellbeing and that of their community.

We hope you like this short collation of evidence and resources. Its our first go at this type of post so your feedback is very welcome.  Please do comment on this post below and tweet recommending other great resources for children and young people’s wellbeing that you’ve found useful and would like to share with others

The development team

Videos from our launch events 29th October 2014 – Part 1 London

The What Works Centre for Wellbeing was announced by our interim Chair Lord Gus O’Donnell on 29th October 2014 at two events, in London and Bristol.  Here are the video of the speakers from the London part of the day with sessions from:

  • Lord O’Donnell chair of the centre’s development group
  • BIS Minister Jo Swinson
  • BT’s Group Director Wellbeing Dr Paul Litchfield
  • Professor Kevin Fenton from Pubilc Health England
  • Government’s National What Works Advisor Dr David Halpern
  • Chief Executive of the Economic and Social Research Council Professor Jane Elliot

Also published for the London part of the event on the 29th was BIS research into the drivers of workplace wellbeing and its links with business performance and the ESRC specifications for the Centre’s evidence programme.

What can I do?

Announcement of the What Works Centre for Wellbeing Lord Gus O’Donnell, Chair of development group for the Centre

Employee wellbeing and productivity  Jo Swinson, Minister for Employment Relations and Consumer Affairs

Wellbeing – A company approach  Dr Paul Litchfield, Group Director Wellbeing, BT  

Wellbeing and public health  Prof Kevin Fenton, National Director Health and Wellbeing, Public Health England 

What works centres  Dr David Halpern, What Works National Advisor 

Getting impact from research Prof Jane Elliott, Chief Executive Economic Social Research Council