Call for Evidence: submit your findings on wellbeing and work transitions

What is the relationship between wellbeing and transitions into – and out of – work? Are workers with lower wellbeing more likely to become unemployed, or move into long-term sick-leave, care or early retirement?

Similarly, if you have higher levels of wellbeing, are you more likely to move from worklessness into employment? By worklessness, we mean not being in regular employment or education/training, because of unemployment, retirement, disability and, family care.

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Oxford Univeristy Resilience for teens project (MYRIAD) recruiting schools

The MYRIAD  my resilience in adolescence project is recruiting schools to take part in a image002 (1)national secondary-school based project led by the University of Oxford.

The project is investigating how schools prepare young people to manage their emotional health and improve their resilience during adolescence. Funded by the Wellcome Trust it is one of the largest projects to explore this area to date.

The research focuses on pupils aged 11-14. It will help researchers gain valuable insight into this critical period in pupil’s lives and look at how the school curriculum could best develop young people’s resilience.

→letter for teachers

If you are interested in taking part please contact the project by the 1st July

→To register an interest in participating click here

Email: myriad@psych.ox.ac.uk  Tel: 01865 613 164

 

Call for evidence: Learning and Wellbeing

We are conducting a review of how learning in the work Work &Learningenvironment influences wellbeing in terms of both learning processes and learning outcomes. While there is a significant body of research that looks at learning interventions in work, or for work, there is little understanding of their relationship to well-being.

Our main research question is as follows;

Within the context of work, to what extent are wellbeing outcomes influenced by learning outcomes and the characteristics of the learning process?

We are looking for high quality evidence that addresses this question to use as best practice examples.

We are particularly seeking evidence that meets the following criteria:

  1. Evaluation studies with assessments of wellbeing taken before and after the learning process – this is to allow us to determine whether the learning process produced any changes in wellbeing subsequent to its introduction.
  2. Evidence that includes comparison groups that did not participate in the course of learning are particularly welcome.
  3. Studies which look at how wellbeing is impacted by either the learning process or outcome and those which look at both.
  4. Evaluations of learning which does or does not have an explicit wellbeing aim.
  5. Evidence of impacts on wellbeing may include stress, mental health, anxiety, depression, life or job satisfaction, resilience or self-efficacy.
  6. Qualitative and quantitative evidence is welcome.

All examples must be written in English or have an English translation and include an author and date. We can only accept evidence which can be made publicly available.

Please send your submissions to evidence@whatworkswellbeing.org

All submissions should be received by 8th of July 2016 .

Call for Evidence: Worklessness, exits from work and wellbeing

We are reviewing the evidence of how worklessness – not  being in paid work and exits from work affect wellbeing.

Work &Learning

 

By worklessness we mean not being in regular employment or education/training, because of unemployment, retirement, disability or family care.

We are specifically interested in evidence which relates to the following research questions:

  1. What are the potential effects of not being in paid work on wellbeing?
  2. How does the duration of not being in paid work affect wellbeing?
  3. What are the impacts of changes in wellbeing on worklessness, duration of worklessness and the subsequent transitions?

We are looking for high quality research on each of these questions to use as best available evidence. We aim to use this evidence to show the impact of different types of worklessness- not being in paid work on wellbeing and the impact of wellbeing on moving in and out of worklessness for different demographic groups.

We are particularly seeking the following types of evidence:

  • Evaluation of how not being in paid work linked to different life circumstances (e.g., retirement, disability, unemployment) impacts on wellbeing.
  • Evaluation of the impact of poor wellbeing on remaining in worklessness
  • Evaluation of the extent to which the wellbeing outcomes of worklessness, duration of worklessness and the transitions between worklessness states vary across groups (e.g., age, gender, family status).

We are particularly interested in the effects of worklessness on life satisfaction. However, evidence of impact on wellbeing that may include stress, mental health, anxiety, and depression are also welcomed.

We welcome evidence of a qualitative or quantitative nature, provided the evidence meets the criteria outlined above.  Studies that use longitudinal methods are preferable. However, we also seek evidence from high quality cross-sectional studies.

→Please send your submissions to: Evidence@WhatWorksWellbeing.org with Worklessness as the title

→All submissions should be received by 20th of June 2016.

 

Take part in a National Employee Mental Wellbeing Survey from Business in the Community

Our emotional health, in both adult and childhood, is the biggest driver of our adult wellbeing, followed by our partner relationship and our employment.  Mental health is one of four areas recommended by the Commission on Wellbeing and Policy where action would improve wellbeing, with wellbeing at work another.  This is why we are supporting the National Employee Mental Wellbeing Survey from Business in the Community → Take part

This week is Mental Heath Awareness week #MHAW16Print

To coincide, Business in the Community have launched the National Employee Mental Wellbeing Survey  – the UK’s largest survey of mental wellbeing at work, taking place annually over 3 years. It includes the personal wellbeing questions used by the Office of National Statistics to measure national wellbeing. 

Are you aged 16-64+ and currently in employment in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland?

www.thewellbeingsurvey.org.uk

Why take part?

  • Mental ill health is the leading cause of sickness absence in the UK and is on the increase. 15.2 million days of sickness absence in 2013 were caused by everyday conditions such as stress anxiety or depression – a dramatic increase from 11.8 million days in 2010.
  • be part of an unprecedented collaboration to transform how the UK approaches mental wellbeing at work.
  •  National Employee Mental Wellbeing Survey  wants to hear from all UK employees – line managers, senior leaders, direct reports – in order to give a complete picture of workers’ mental wellbeing now,what employers are doing about it, and what needs to change.  Every opinion counts.

We want to conduct the UK’s largest survey of mental wellbeing at work in the UK to gain a snapshot of the UK workforce’s mental wellbeing, and its capacity to support wellbeing.

– Business in the Community

Why businesses should take part in the survey?

BiTC believe we are nearing a crisis point for mental wellbeing in work and it is a business critical issue for all organisations:

  • Mental health costs the UK £70 billion per year, equivalent to 5% of GDP.
  • Mental ill health costs each employer £1,035 per employee, per year.
  • Failure to unlock the workforce’s full potential costs UK business £6 billion.
  • Only 2 in 5 employees are working at peak performance.
  • Studies suggest that presenteeism from mental ill health alone costs the UK economy £15.1 billion per annum, almost twice the business cost of employee absence from work.
  • More line managers are experiencing stress-related ill-health and symptoms of psychological ill-health.
  • 3 in 5 managers are concerned about the impact of longer working hours on their stress levels.

There is still a stigma associated with mental health, through a lack of understanding.  People might feel very happy to tell a colleague about a physical injury they’ve sustained, but when it comes to mental health, people can keep this to themselves through fear of being treated differently or judged.

  • Only a third of employees received any support to manage workplace stress.
  • Less than half of those that are affected by mental ill health feel confident to disclose their condition in the workplace, which can mean issues become more severe.

→ Information for employers

→ Information for individuals

→ Take the survey www.thewellbeingsurvey.org.uk

Call for Evidence: Culture & Sport – Grey literature on wellbeing outcomes of music and singing

Evidence Call for Grey Literature for a systematic review of the wellbeing outcomes of music and singing in adults and the processes by which wellbeing outcomes are achieved.

By grey literature we mean “literature that is not formally published in sources such as books or journal articles” (Lefebvre, Manheimer, & Glanville, 2008, p. 106). This may be produced by charities, government departments, businesses, community groups and others; and may include reports, theses or dissertations, trials, and more.

In this instance we’re looking for evaluation reports.

We will accept for review and possible inclusion in our systematic review using the following criteria:C&S call for evidence (2)

  •  submissions must be evaluation reports only
  •  reports submitted must be completed in the past 3 years (2013-2016) and include
  • author details (individuals, groups or organisations)
  •  evaluation methods may be qualitative, quantitative methods or mixed methods
  •  the central report objective must be the evaluation of music or singing intervention

Please note the following condition for review of grey literature:

  •  Evidence can only be reviewed for inclusion in the work of the Culture and Sport programme if submitted through this call.
  • Evidence submitted to individual researchers in the programme cannot be considered.
  • If you have previously sent documents to the culture and sport team please re-submit through this call.

Please send your submissions to evidence@whatworkswellbeing.org  and include ‘Music and Singing Evidence’ in the subject line.

The deadline for submissions is the 10th June 2016

Please note additional invite for submission of primary data sets for review:

  •  Primary data sets used in submitted reports can also be submitted
  • Primary data may be qualitative or quantitative and in excel or word formats.
  • Please submit data sets directly to, or contact annette.payne@brunel.ac.uk for further information.

→discuss on our forum

 

Call for evidence: Job quality, other employment practices and wellbeing

Work &Learning

We are  conducting a review of job quality and wellbeing.

Job quality relates to the features of work often perceived to relate to satisfying or desirable work experiences – such as:

  • some involvement in decisions about how work is to done, when it is to be done or what is to be done
  • clarity of what is to be achieved at work
  • the chance to use a variety of skills at work
  • good working relationships with colleagues and/or customers
  • attainable goals and work demands or goals that do not conflict with one and other
  •  reasonable working hours

We are specifically interested in two research questions:

1) Do improvements in job quality lead to reliable effects on worker wellbeing and productivity?

2) Are more positive outcomes achieved by introducing other changes to employment  practices alongside improved job quality?

We are looking for high quality evidence on each of these questions to use as best practice examples. We are particularly seeking the following types of evidence:

  • Evaluation studies with assessments of wellbeing made before and after the introduction of the intervention – this is to allow us to determine whether the intervention produced any changes in wellbeing.
  • Evaluations including comparison groups that did not receive the intervention.
  • Studies showing the combined effects of improvements in job quality and other employment practices introduced at the same time.
  • Evidence of impacts on wellbeing that may include stress, mental health, anxiety, depression, life or job satisfaction, burnout, or engagement.
  • Evidence of changes in productivity and performance that may include factors such as safety, performance and absence.
  • Qualitative or quantitative evidence is welcome.
  • Evidence from studies conducted in the UK or with a UK component is preferred.

All examples must be written in English or have an English translation and include an author and date. We can only accept evidence which can be made publicly available.

→Please send your submissions to evidence@whatworkswellbeing.org  and include ‘Job Quality Evidence’ in the subject line.  

All submissions should be received by 13th of May 2016 .